SPRINKLER SYSTEMS / FIRE SAFETY FOR INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES

SPRINKLER SYSTEM TERMS AND DEFINITIONS:

1)  ESFR System:                          

Early Suppression/Fast Response

Designed to extinguish fire – not to contain it

Typically use a K-14, K-17, or K-25* head depending on application.  Need a minimum of approximately 65-70 lbs of water pressure for a 24’ clear building with 8” line.  Otherwise, a pump will be required.  Installed pump is +/- $100,000.

*  K25 head will operate as little as 15 psi for a 24’ clear building.  K25 will eliminate need for pump in many cases.

2)  ESFR COSTS:

Retrofit cost (empty building) of $2.50 p/sf – including demo of old system.

New Construction Cost:   $1.50 p/sf plus $45,000 for pump (if needed), Plus cost of electrical, ventilation, etc for pump room.

3)  K Factor:

Value of sprinkler head used to determine flows and pressure (higher the better).  Currently, highest is K-25.

4)  Density:

Gallons/minute per square foot = gpm

Over an area (usually 2,000 s.f.)

Used with Class I – IV systems – (higher the better)

ESFR Systems require four sprinklers to be calculated on three lines. Typically requiring approximately 1200 gallons per minute to operate.

5)  Factory Mutual:

Preferred risk insurer with stringent design criteria.

6)  Underwriter Laboratories:

Approving agency

7)  Encapsulation:

All sides of product are covered with plastic – prevents water from reaching product.

8)  NFPA 231/231C:

National Fire Protection Association

231-      Addresses General Storage

231C-   Addresses Rack Storage

9)  Dry System:

Sprinkler system that is pressurized with air.  Water is at the valve in heated valve room.  Typically used in unheated warehouses and loading dock areas.

10)  Head Temperature:               

Temperature at which the sprinkler head will “go off” or “activate” – most warehouses uses 286 degrees – ESFR systems typically use 165 degrees.

11)  BOCA/International Building Code:

BOCA- Code being phased out –

New Code is the International Building Code and International Fire Code.

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